Two research facilities are being constructed in Princeton’s industrial park. (Optimi Health photo)

Two research facilities are being constructed in Princeton’s industrial park. (Optimi Health photo)

Princeton set to grow ‘magic’ mushrooms

Research and development will take place at B.C. Green Pharmaceuticals

Princeton’s B.C. Green Pharmaceutical medical marijuana compound is getting a bit of magic.

It was announced earlier this month that two research facilities, on adjoining property to the established cannabis plant, will explore and promote the potential health benefits of what most people would call ‘magic’ mushrooms.

“Welcome to business-friendly and environmentally conscious Princeton, British Columbia. Optimi Health will cultivate, extract, process, package and ship the finest strains of functional mushrooms from it’s two purpose-built, GMP-capable facilities,” states Optimi’s website.

Brian Safarik is part owner of B.C. Green, and also the chief operating officer and a director of Optimi Health.

He was unavailable for an interview, as the Spotlight went to press.

Optimi recently completed a successful $20.7 million initial public offering.

“(There is) continued construction and build-out of its dual facility (combined 20,000 sq. ft.) operations in Princeton, British Columbia. Upon completion, integrated cultivation, advanced agronomy, genomic research, processing, manufacturing, and laboratory services will be housed on the property which includes additional space for expansion,” stated a press release.

Mushrooms are being viewed as an alternative therapy to treat depression, anxiety, dementia and PTSD.

Related: ‘I’ve been able to be happy and anxiety-free’: B.C. woman pilots ‘magic mushroom’ therapy

Princeton’s economic development director Gary Schatz said he is thrilled with Optimi’s direction.

“I think it’s pretty phenomenal,” he said, noting the industry represents significant diversification for the local economy.

BC Green purchased property in Princeton’s industrial park in August 2018.

Mayor Spencer Coyne said the idea that research and production originating in Princeton could help millions of struggling people is heartwarming.

“I just think that is amazing,” Coyne said.

Related: Princeton cannabis plant thriving despite lawsuit and bad press, says owner

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:mailto:andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com


 
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